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A Conversation with Lily August 2, 2017

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Lily has scratches. That’s a blog post in itself, but for another day. The first day I tried to rub the scabs off she had a fit. I understand they hurt and I understand she is sensitive, but trying to kick me while holding her hind foot is unacceptable behavior. So Lily and I went outside and had a conversation. This was the first serious talk she and I had, and she was initially stunned. I started moving her one direction and then the other and she exploded because she didn’t like being told what to do. However, within only a few minutes she settled down and listened. Good enough for that day.

The following day I went back to work with her again. I figured she would either be like “get away from me you mean lady” or would listen nicely. I was very glad to see that she listened quite well and acted like a lady. She was relatively good for working with her scratches, and she continues to be. She doesn’t like it, but she has not tried to kick me again.

I have since worked with her several more times and she is spot on. Lily is quite smart and willing to work as long as she has her thinking brain on and not her flight brain. (She did break her lead rope spooking at someone wearing a rain slicker. Sigh… We have not gotten to desensitizing with a rain slicker, but it’s on the list.) Today was the first time she had to work while something else was going on around her. A person was bringing horses in while I had her in the outdoor arena. At first she thought it was impossible to focus on me when other things were happening, but it took very little to convince her that she could. Then she tuned into me and didn’t look at the other horses again. I am very impressed with her brain and her willingness. Now only if she can learn to tone down the flight response…

 

Working with Lily July 14, 2017

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Stylized Lily

Lily surveying her new digs at Windy Oak Farm.

Lily has settled into her new life pretty well. This is the first young horse I have not had living on my property. I didn’t give it much thought at first, but I have quickly come to see how important that is to a young horse – especially a sensitive Arabian. Lily is smart, but very reactive, opinionated and has a strong flight response. She is independent and the sort of Arabian that demands you meet her standards of perfection – not an easy task.

When I had horses on my own farm I was the person handling them 99% of the time. I did everything – turn in, turn out, feed, water, clean, exercise, hold for the vet and farrier, etc. The horses learned I was their person, and they could expect the routine to be the same day in and day out. Everything from the order they go in and out to how they walk through gates and into their stalls. Consistency was key, and it worked especially well for the sensitive ones.

With Lily being boarded, there are 6 people (including myself) that handle her. That’s a lot for a young, impressionable filly. It’s impossible (and an unreasonable thing to ask) to keep things completely consistent across the board and with Lily it shows. Initially I thought working with her 4 days a week would suffice, but I didn’t factor in the fact that I am no longer the person doing everything. I underestimated the value of that crucial aspect. Thus, it’s up to me as a horseperson to figure out how to best educate Lily in her current circumstances so that she is a well-mannered filly. It’s a new challenge and new learning experience for me, but that’s what different horses do. They teach you all sorts of things you didn’t realize you didn’t know.

 

Introducing Lily May 26, 2017

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My blog has been more than inactive. I started it to chronicle my activities with rescue-type horses. The mares Gwen and Bahea both found fabulous homes and I’m happy to report both are loved and doing very well. I’ve had one eye open for another horse, but nothing has fit the bill.

Three years ago I made the decision to breed my first horse – a purebred Arabian intended for racing. I leased a mare named Awesome Blossom from Michelle Morgan at Mandolynn Hill Farm in Texas, selected the stallion Sadeem from Forta Stud in Abu Dhabi, UAE and got lucky. The following year a beautiful bay filly was born. Named Stylized Lily, she has lived the last 2 years with her friends in Texas.

LILY (21)

Circumstances worked out such that the timing worked to bring her to Maryland. While I still want to give her time to grow up, it is definitely time to start doing groundwork with her and getting her ready for her future as a race horse or sport horse. So next week she is shipping to Windy Oak Farm in Union Bridge, MD where my mare Nadia (also from Mandolynn Hill Farm) lives.

I thought this was a good reason to bring the blog back – to talk about life with Lily and documenting her education towards becoming a racehorse. Hopefully all will go smoothly, but we all know that horses seldom stick to your plan. I look forward to you joining me in this journey. Hopefully it’s going to be a fun ride.

Lily trot2 Feb2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo by Steve Heath.

 

Gwen in Her New Home November 18, 2015

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The time came for Gwen to find her permanent home. Several different people looked at her, but there was one person Debra and I both agreed upon that Gwen liked the best. But the timing wasn’t right. A year later (maybe more – time goes so fast) the situation changed. Gwen still needed a good home and her person was now able to take her. And as fate, or destiny, or whatever you want to call it, would have it, Gwen was available.

On Saturday, November 14, Debra hauled Gwen to her new home in Virginia. There she has other horsey friends and will live her life as a riding horse and spoiled diva princess – which is how it should be. Debra, especially, was sad to see Gwen go. After all, she had spent every day with her since Gwen came into our lives. I just floated in and out as needed. But we feel good in the home that she now has. We both knew it was the right situation. We just had to wait for the right time. Gwen will be loved and cared for and that’s all we can ask for in the end. It was our goal from the very beginning…to take this injured, slaughter-bound majestic creature and give her a chance at another life. I’m very proud to say that we did that. Many thanks to Debra for taking such good care of her the last few years. She deserves the vast majority of the credit. Job well done.

 

Gwen Emilie2

Gwen checking out her new surroundings…and making sure there is enough grass to eat.

 

Remember Gwen? July 29, 2014

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It’s been some time since I’ve talked about Gwen. Debra and I got her from Camelot a little over a year ago. If you need a reminder, this is what she looked like at the time.

G glamour shot

And here is Gwen today.

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She has put on weight. Eating is one of her favorite things to do in life. The only remnant of her cut up legs is a small scar on her left front, which was the most injured of the four. She is sound, sassy, happy and very spoiled. We’ve always been curious of her parentage. A number of us thought she was an Anglo-Arab (Arabian/Thoroughbred cross) so Debra sent mane hairs off to Texas A&M for a DNA analysis. They can’t tell you exactly what a horse is, but they can tell you what the horse most likely is. We were surprised with the results. Number 1 and 2 on the list were Morgan and Saddlebred. Number 3 was Arabian. Now that she’s put on more weight, we can see Morgan in her but none of us can really see Saddlebred. So, we’ve decided she is a Morgan/Arabian cross. It doesn’t really make any difference. Gwen is Gwen and we love her regardless, but it was fun to find out.

Debra wanted me to include this quote for Gwen the next time I talked about her. I don’t know the author so I can’t give credit, but it works for Gwen and probably all rescued animals.

“I have nothing to fear, and here my story ends. My troubles are over, and I am home.”

 

Stephanie J. Corum Named Editor-In-Chief of Arabian Finish Line May 27, 2014

The following is a copy of a press release sent out last week. I’m very excited for this new adventure but I will continue to work with the horses and blog about it. That part is too much fun to give up!
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 21, 2014

The Arabian racing industry suffered a significant blow with the unexpected passing of Bobbi Patscheider, longtime editor of Arabian Finish Line and staunch racing supporter. However, earlier this year, she had begun discussions of turning the magazine over to Stephanie J. Corum, and this transition is now occurring. The magazine will change its base of location from Summerfield, FL to Frederick, MD and continue to be a monthly print publication with plans to go digital in the future. Finish Line also publishes an annual Stallion Guide which will be in both print and digital formats.

Corum has been a regular contributor for Arabian Finish Line since 2000 and she has over 25 years of experience in Arabian and thoroughbred racing. She is a familiar, well-respected face in Arabian racing and suited to take the reins of the publication. “While I am very excited for this new challenge I wish it were under different circumstances. I would like Bobbi here to help with the transition, but her husband Don and daughter Judy have been very gracious and helpful. Everyone I have spoken to are enthused that the magazine will continue and are very supportive of my role in it. I see great things ahead for Arabian Finish Line, and it is my goal to make Bobbi proud.”

Corliss Hazard, another longtime member of the Arabian racing industry and media professional, has been named Director of Marketing. “I am very excited about Stephanie’s vision for the magazine and quite honored to be associated in her leadership for Arabian racing’s foremost publication.  As she takes over the reins from the revered Bobbi Patscheider, we all find ourselves guardians of a proven winner- a magazine as enduring as the horse it represents.  Positioned for its best years yet, exciting changes are about to happen. Arabian Finish Line is set to launch an impressive drive, and the avid support of everyone involved with purebred Arabian racehorses will lift this industry to the next level of growth and participation.  You will see changes that will elevate your spirit. The new marketing focus of Arabian Finish Line is to provide enhanced results for advertisers by reaching out to a greater audience, and in turn growing a grand, legitimate marketplace for the magnificent race-bred Arabian horse.”

The next issue will be a combined June/July issue and then will resume its monthly schedule. Advertising and content deadline is the tenth of every month.

The new contact information is as follows:
Arabian Finish Line
7820B Wormans Mill Road, Suite 253
Frederick, MD 21701
240-344-1462
sjcorum@arabianfinishline.com
www.arabianfinishline.com

 

Bahea Goes to a Horse Show May 12, 2014

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One of the “tests” that remained with Bahea was how she would be at a horse show. This Saturday I took her to a small schooling dressage show and did training level test 1. Prior to the show, she bathed fine and clipped fine after giving her a few moments to remember what the clippers were. Then she tried to eat them and kept wiggling her muzzle while I was clipping it. She loaded on the trailer perfectly and (along with my horse Nadia) off we went!

Now I decided to show both of the horses on the same day because in that way I was taking up one weekend day instead of two. Good idea in theory, but the girls were definitely more worried about where each other was. Thank goodness that Plantation Valley Stable allowed me to use 2 stalls and my friends Carol and Deb were available to help me. If it weren’t for that I don’t think I would’ve been able to manage them.

Bahea warmed up like an experienced show horse and she stood outside the arena like she’d done it many times before. I’m not sure when her last show was, but it’s been years. Still, she obviously remembered what the scene was all about. Alone in the arena, however, she got nervous and tense. She started grinding the bit and wanted to look around a lot. She tried to be a little extra exuberant in the canter. But overall, she behaved herself well and acted how I expected her to. She scored a 61.45% which was lower than I would have liked but good enough to win her class. Good girl!

Storm clouds rolled in soon after we were done. During a break in the showers we loaded the horses up, but the rain started again soon afterwards. I had the misfortune to drive back to the farm in what felt like a hurricane. It was not a lot of fun and the horses were not happy. It started thundering by the time I arrived at the barn so I quickly managed to unload and get them in before it got too bad. Bless little Bahea’s heart she fell asleep in her stall about 15 minutes later. It was a tiring day for the girl.

Of course, in trying to just get the horses, myself and all our stuff, I completely forgot to take any pictures at the show. Sorry about that folks. But, believe me, she was a cutie all cleaned up!

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